Akboritha… Out-of-Print

Akboritha-soft-cover-webWithin a week of its publication, the limited edition print run of Richard W. Rohlin’s Akboritha has now sold out. Many thanks to all of Richard’s supporters. We are pleased to announce that the softcover version will be re-released in a second impression and will launch at the 2022 Inklings Festival in Wichita this October. Richard, a lecturer for the event, will be available to sign copies. Also, this new impression will be open to international customers.

Personally, I am grateful to Richard for trusting my small, one-man operation with his visionary work. I express apologies for my shortcomings. Special thanks to all lovers of beautiful, physical books, and of storytelling which is grounded in first principles and that which awakens the moral imagination.

Christopher Tompkins
Darkly Bright Press

With Gratitude…

Akboritha-soft-cover-webAs of this posting, there remains less than 10 copies of Richard W. Rohlin’s Akboritha for purchase. Both Richard and I are grateful for the show of support, and as a result, we are happy and excited to announce that future projects are being planned. Again, thanks to all of his supporters.


NEW POETRY

Orthodox by Joshua Alan Sturgill

The Pilgrimage, Book II: Part 4 by Phillip Neal Tippin


THE WEEKLY MACHEN

George_Moore_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_19028
George Moore

The English Language: Is Mr. George Moore right in his gloomy prophecy as to the future of the English language? Interviewed in the Fortnightly, he declares that if English is to have any future—“which I doubt”—it will be in America. “You are still inventing a language while we have stopped…

Akboritha: Available August 1st

Akboritha-soft-cover-webRichard W. Rohlin’s Akboritha will be available for purchase on August 1st at 2:00 pm MST.

Rohlin’s Introduction Video

An Interview with Richard Rohlin



NEW POETRY

Step Outside by Joshua Alan Sturgill

The Pilgrimage, Book II: Part 3 by Phillip Neal Tippin

Jesse Keith Butler has published a sonnet entitled The Lonesome Blues in the Orchards Poetry Journal. Congratulations!


THE WEEKLY MACHEN

arthur-1920wBunyan’s Book: Bunyan tells us by his method that there never was an individual named Christian who left a material city and fell into an actual swamp or slough; and we have every reason to doubt whether a Spaniard who called himself Don Quixote ever lived in a village of La Manche. But all these stories are true—because under a particular symbolism they give us a faithful image of our own souls and their adventures. …

Every Good Ghostly Tale

Kirk 31 May 1985 photo by Dale Nelson

FEATURE

Russell Kirk: Inkling Without the Inklings by Dale Nelson

This week we are pleased to present an article on the Conservative theorist and ghost story writer Russell Kirk. In 1985, Dale Nelson met and interviewed Kirk. During the conversation, the author discussed his purpose in writing speculative literature: “My uncanny tales are intended to wake the moral imagination.”


NEW POETRY

Prima Causa by Joshua Alan Sturgill

The Pilgrimage, Book II: Part 2 by Phillip Neal Tippin


THE WEEKLY MACHEN

170px-Anna_Pavlova_as_the_Dying_SwanThe “Language” of the Dance: And the music swelled and grew and died with strange cadences; and I felt, as I say, that here something of the ancient world had been recovered, that one could understand the secret significance of such worlds as nymph and faun, of all the wonderful fairy-tales in which the old peoples told the truth.

A New Pilgrimage Begins…

_PNT-bannerNEW POETRY

From December 2020 to September 2021, Darkly Bright Press serialized The Pilgrimage, a long-form poetry project by Phillip Neal Tippin. This week, we happily announce the commencement of Book II.

The Trees by Joshua Alan Sturgill


THE MACHEN WEEKLY

220px-Luise,_Erzherzogin_von_Österreich-ToskanaThe Apologia of Princess: It is impossible, of course, to form a judgement on the story that follows. The Princess’s tale is none too clear; she talks of enemies in high places, of spies, of malignant and concocted scandals, of curtains moving gently in her apartment, of shadowy forms slinking away from her boudoir door. It seems clear that the Tuscan princess was “free and easy,” and the Court of Dresden was the reverse of free and easy. The reigning family, according to the author, is dévote: she, as we have seen, does not like many rosaries in a house. …